Battery Inverter/charger upgrade

I am doing a mock-up in my garage for a battery Inverter/charger upgrade. I want to get most of the cabling done outside of the TAB 400. I did power it up and it works great.

On paper this should run my Air conditioner for at least 7 hours.

I will now be able to stop at a Walmart in the summer and still be comfortable.

For boondocking I can use a smaller generator and use it less often.

SOK lithium batteries 206Ah each 618Ah total

Victron multiples 3000 12v


Comments

  • Denny16Denny16 Member Posts: 3,565
    edited November 22
    Interesting idea RFraer, what year is your TaB400 build?  I would be concerned with the total weight of this battery/inverter setup also, compared withnthe weight of original AGM Batteries.  

    Depending on the year of your TaB was built, the floor construction is different, and may be an issue supporting the weight.  Also, this could change your total trailer weight distribution and effect the tongue weight negatively (making it too light).
     Cheers 
    2018 TaB400 Custom BoonDock, Jeep Gladiator truck, Northern California Coast.
  • RFraerRFraer Member Posts: 47
    Denny16 said:
    Interesting idea RFraer, what year is your TaB400 build?  I would be concerned with the total weight of this battery/inverter setup also, compared withnthe weight of original AGM Batteries.  

    Depending on the year of your TaB was built, the floor construction is different, and may be an issue supporting the weight.  Also, this could change your total trailer weight distribution and effect the tongue weight negatively (making it too light).
     Cheers 

    I did consider the weight, by my estimate I am adding 40 lbs. There is only 10lbs difference in battery weight and about 5X more usable energy storage.   I have looked at the frame and crossmembers I don’t think there will be a problem with structure.  Ironically I had my original AC replaced with a Cool-Cat that was relocated from the rear to the front so after the upgrade my weight balance will be closer to when I bought the camper.


  • Denny16Denny16 Member Posts: 3,565
    edited November 25
    Good, then you should be good to go.  When my 200 amp AGM needs replaced, it will be with 300-400 amps of Lithium also.
     Cheers 
    2018 TaB400 Custom BoonDock, Jeep Gladiator truck, Northern California Coast.
  • Dutch061Dutch061 Member Posts: 486
    edited November 25
    Looking great!

    I will be very interested to hear back on your experience after you have it set up and using it. I am loaded with 400 Ah of Battleborn in our 2020 TAB 400 BDL after adding 2 more batteries a couple of weeks ago. I am on my first outing since that addition and I am very impressed.

    I will be curious to 2 factors mostly.

    1. How your actual battery life is using your AC
    2. Amount of time to recharge the 618 Ah of batteries. 

    You mention "being able to use a smaller generator less often" to charge your battery bank. My concern would be that to charge at 120 Amps (if I looked at the correct Victron unit) will push the limits of a smaller generator. However, I realize that this unit has Power Control and Power Assist but I don't believe that will do much for charging beyond limiting the charge current to prevent generator overload. Which essentially means that you may not be able to get 120 Amps charging current while using a smaller generator.

    I am using a 60 Amp PD Converter and if I am completely spent, on paper it appears that it will take close to 7 hours, which is still a fraction of the time required with the WFCO and stock AGM batteries (at least on a 2020). I have considered bumping to an 80 Amp charger, but it requires a 20 Amp outlet for power. Some of the reviews I have read with the 80 Amp is people having issues trying to use generators that are in the 2000 Watt range and not able to due to "over current". Since I am using a 3500 Watt generator, that is not so much of a concern for me while camping but it could introduce problems trying to charge at home. As per the specs from PD, this is only supposed to draw 1300 Watts (10.83 Amps) but as mentioned from the reviews it apparently is much higher. Which allegedly PD has stated to some of the people who have reviewed.

    Brad


    2020 400 BDL aka "Boonie"
    2021 F-250 Tremor with PSD aka "Azul"
    Concord, NC 
  • rh5555rh5555 Member Posts: 324
    edited November 25
    Slightly off-topic, but interesting:
    We have the the Progressive Industries EMS-HW30C which monitors all shore power to our trailer. This unit incorrectly reports the current consumed by our converter -  it reads about 33% high.  I believe this is because the converter presents an inductive load (so current and voltage are not in-phase) and the EMS-HW30C doesn't account for this.  If you want to accurately measure the current drawn by your inverter, use something like a Kill-a-watt power monitor - this seems to be accurate.
    Roger and Sue Hill | 2020 [email protected] Boondock ([email protected]) | 2022 Land Rover Defender 110 - P400 | San Juan Island, WA
  • Dutch061Dutch061 Member Posts: 486
    edited November 26
    @rh5555, great point. I have a clamp on inductive amp meter if I really want to know other than looking at the display on my generator. I know in the past, you have mentioned the inaccuracy of the current measuring function of the EMS-HW30C, so I have never even looked at it. If I am at a campsite with power (rare occurrence), I will look to make sure it is free of errors and that is all.

    I am suspecting that the Victron unit will take 15 Amps @120 VAC at least while putting out 120 Amps @ 12 VDC

    Brad
    2020 400 BDL aka "Boonie"
    2021 F-250 Tremor with PSD aka "Azul"
    Concord, NC 
  • RFraerRFraer Member Posts: 47

    I will update the post when I get the system fully installed and post my findings after running the AC off grid and charging with a generator. I admit that I have not used my Honda 2000 to charge the batteries yet but am assuming if I adjust the multiplus amp draw below the generator amp output the generator will not trip.

     I understand that I will have limited charging capability though solar and a 9 amp (110w) DC-DC charger off the tow vehicle 7pin but I plan on adding an additional 30 amp DC-Dc charger and Anderson connector to the tow vehicle to get more charge current from my 240 amp alternator.  I attached my wiring diagram, I have limited electrical experience so if anyone sees any mistakes let me know.


  • ViajeroViajero Member Posts: 34
    Good morning RFraer. If you don’t mind me asking. 

    1. Is the 9 amp DC to DC converter the Victron model?  

    2.  Where did you intercept the charge line?  Back of the converter etc?  

    3.  We’ll go with the stock Harris 6 volt AGM’s for a season to see how they do, but I’m curious what you are setting your charge voltage for out of the DC to DC converter. 14.2 volts etc. 

    4.  No alternator as our tow vehicle is a Tesla. But the voltage at the 7 pin connector is apparently low 13 ish volts. The other reason we don’t want to add batteries is the tesla has an 82 KW battery on board that is accessible through the 7 pin when the car is in “camp mode”. 

    Our car and trailer arrive in a couple months so just wrapping my mind around some of our planned mods. 

    Thanks in advance. 

    John 

    PS   The picture is of the DC to DC converter we will use for our project. 


  • RFraerRFraer Member Posts: 47
    John,

     1.   Yes it is the same 9 amp (110w DC to DC converter as you show,  I was going to use the 18 amp converter but my 7- pin wiring is 12ga  rated for 20 amps and that was to close for me. I plan on adding a 30amp converter wired straight to the alternator soon.  The two converters should  give me 550 watts to charge the batteries when driving. I will also have some power from  solar so after a 8 hour drive I should have close to a full charge.

    2.  My Batteries and inverter are in the back under the bed and the WCO power center is in front under the small dinette seat. I plan to connect to the 6 ga wires going into the 12v feed from the batteries near the WCO up front.

    3. The primary reason for upgrading for me is to not need a RV campground on hot weather days. As long as you don’t want off grid air conditioning  without using a generator the Harris 6 volt AGM’s work fine. 

    4 Is it the Tesla Truck? that would look cool.


  • ViajeroViajero Member Posts: 34
    RFraer said:
    John,

     1.   Yes it is the same 9 amp (110w DC to DC converter as you show,  I was going to use the 18 amp converter but my 7- pin wiring is 12ga  rated for 20 amps and that was to close for me. I plan on adding a 30amp converter wired straight to the alternator soon.  The two converters should  give me 550 watts to charge the batteries when driving. I will also have some power from  solar so after a 8 hour drive I should have close to a full charge.

    2.  My Batteries and inverter are in the back under the bed and the WCO power center is in front under the small dinette seat. I plan to connect to the 6 ga wires going into the 12v feed from the batteries near the WCO up front.

    3. The primary reason for upgrading for me is to not need a RV campground on hot weather days. As long as you don’t want off grid air conditioning  without using a generator the Harris 6 volt AGM’s work fine. 

    4 Is it the Tesla Truck? that would look cool.


    Great info. Thank you. It is not the Cybertruck but rather the model Y. 

    The reason we chose this victron model is the 7 pin charge line is limited to 16 amps peak or 12 amps constant. It is a self resetting soft breaker. (Software controlled breaker). 

    I think my plan will be to identify the wire leaving the junction box under the storage box on the tongue and then find that wire on the back of the converter. Intercept it there and run it into the victron dc to dc converter. From there run a separate line to the battery. That will allow for normal operation of the converter when on shore power. 

    If our trailer battery gets too low and solar can’t keep up (in the shade or whatever) I can put the Tesla in “camp mode” and feed the trailer battery with 9 amps via the victron. The victron will boost the voltage to a decent level for charging, although the current will drop off somewhat. 

    Impressive diagram by the way. I’m sure that will work out well. Kudos on the 6 gauge. I’m doing everything with 10 gauge...for now. 

    Cheers. 
  • RFraerRFraer Member Posts: 47
    Forgot to mention my charge voltage is 14.6 for the SOK batteries. 
  • ViajeroViajero Member Posts: 34
    RFraer said:
    Forgot to mention my charge voltage is 14.6 for the SOK batteries. 
    Good to know. I was thinking along the lines of 14.2 volts for the AGM’s. A little less than ideal for bulk charging but a little more set and forget. Thoughts?  
  • RFraerRFraer Member Posts: 47
    Viajero said:
    RFraer said:
    Forgot to mention my charge voltage is 14.6 for the SOK batteries. 
    Good to know. I was thinking along the lines of 14.2 volts for the AGM’s. A little less than ideal for bulk charging but a little more set and forget. Thoughts?  

    If you get solar on your camper I would set the converter to match the solar charger value set by NuCamp for AGM’s


  • ViajeroViajero Member Posts: 34
    RFraer said:
    Viajero said:
    RFraer said:
    Forgot to mention my charge voltage is 14.6 for the SOK batteries. 
    Good to know. I was thinking along the lines of 14.2 volts for the AGM’s. A little less than ideal for bulk charging but a little more set and forget. Thoughts?  

    If you get solar on your camper I would set the converter to match the solar charger value set by NuCamp for AGM’s


    Good point. We ordered it with the solar. Not sure what the controller is set for but I’ll measure it when we get it and then adjust the victron accordingly. Good catch. Thank you. 

    John. 
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