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Dutch061

Okay, when I installed the shunt, I put it just forward of the Battery Junction Block. I moved the factory made and installed negative cable from the negative terminal of the junction block to the shunt and installed a short jumper between the shunt and the junction block. When I installed the 4 gauge cables for the PD9260CV, I installed those directly to the junction block terminals also. In the attached photo, you can see the PD9260CV but more importantly just above it you can see the shunt. I drew a yellow circle (difficult with a mouse and pc) around the factory cable on the shunt.  This allows any power that is going in or out of the battery to pass through the shunt. The charger wouldn't have to go through the shunt, other than to measure the efficiency of the converter set up. Since this information (current flow during charging) is not used to determine when to set the SOC (state of charge) to 100%. In upgrading the batteries, I made all new cables for everything other than the inverter using 2/0 solid copper cables and crimped on the ends. So I no longer have the smaller gauge cables and poorly crimped ends. Yes, they are adequate for low power, but if you want to use the 1200 watt Inverter towards the upper end, they are not sufficient due to the wire size and low conductor count. I have thought a lot about upgrading the inverter but haven't convinced myself of the need, yet anyway.  Let me know if that helps, otherwise I can provide additional input and/or answer questions you may have.  Brad

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Dutch061
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  • Dutch061
    Okay, when I installed the shunt, I put it just forward of the Battery Junction Block. I moved the factory made and installed negative cable from the negative terminal of the junction block to the shunt and installed a short jumper between the shunt and the junction block. When I installed the 4 gauge cables for the PD9260CV, I installed those directly to the junction block terminals also.

    In the attached photo, you can see the PD9260CV but more importantly just above it you can see the shunt. I drew a yellow circle (difficult with a mouse and pc) around the factory cable on the shunt. 

    This allows any power that is going in or out of the battery to pass through the shunt. The charger wouldn't have to go through the shunt, other than to measure the efficiency of the converter set up. Since this information (current flow during charging) is not used to determine when to set the SOC (state of charge) to 100%.

    In upgrading the batteries, I made all new cables for everything other than the inverter using 2/0 solid copper cables and crimped on the ends. So I no longer have the smaller gauge cables and poorly crimped ends. Yes, they are adequate for low power, but if you want to use the 1200 watt Inverter towards the upper end, they are not sufficient due to the wire size and low conductor count. I have thought a lot about upgrading the inverter but haven't convinced myself of the need, yet anyway. 


    Let me know if that helps, otherwise I can provide additional input and/or answer questions you may have. 

    Brad



    June 24
  • TNOutback
    I figured I can ask you this question since you’ve installed a converter/charger closer to the batteries.  I’m having a brain moment and want someone else’s thoughts on this.  As I mentioned in my post, I’ve bought a portable battery charger as a temporary solution to charging the batts from a generator.  I was about to wire the leads of the charger directly to the battery posts, but if I do that, I think I will lose visibility to the amount of power going into the batts since the negative lead will be upstream of my BMV-712 shunt.  So, maybe I should mount the + lead of the battery charger to the termination block outside of the battery compartment, and the - lead to the downstream side of the BMV shunt.  Thoughts?
    June 24