Recommended regular [email protected] maintenance?

twocutestwocutes Member Posts: 172
I've seen postings of people repacking bearings and adjusting torque.  One of the manuals advises to adjust the electronic brakes on the [email protected]  I admit, I haven't done anything except dewinterize, winterize, and tow it.  
Has someone developed or found a maintenance checklist, based upon mileage, similar to what you would find in a TV manual?  I now have between 2500 and 3000 miles on the [email protected] and am thinking I should be doing something (besides getting those washers for the clamshell - hee hee).  Thanks!
Beth
Minnesota
Practicing to be a wanderer
2014 [email protected] CS-S [email protected] with wet bath, 2015 Jeep Wrangler Unlimited 6 speed

Comments

  • VernaVerna Administrator Posts: 5,677

    Yup, we need a list.  I had the wheel bearings repacked and greased as close to 6,000 miles as I could on my Silver Shadow.  When I stopped for a break, or at the end of a long downhill, I checked the center of the wheels for heat (never did get hot).  I checked the air pressure in the tires.  But, now I realize I'm not sure about the wheel bearing maintenance on my 2014 [email protected]  I did find out I just have to check they hydraulic fluid on the surge brakes every once in a while.

    If you don't have a maintenance free battery, you do need to check the level in the battery.  Only use distilled water.

    From reading here, you need to check the level of the glycol for the Alde.  Only fill with distilled water or the specific glycol mixture (do a search, Normfun found the correct brand at O'Reilly Auto Parts).

    Check for tire wear.  It sure looks easier to see than on my Silver Shadow with those beautiful flared fiberglass fenders!

    Check to make sure your spare tire is still tight, no matter where you store it.

    Next.....

    Verna, Columbus, IN, 2019 [email protected] 400 Boondock Lite white/red, towed by a white 2019 Ford F-150 4x4 Supercab, 3.5L V6 Ecoboost; [email protected] Administrator
  • Michigan_MikeMichigan_Mike Administrator Posts: 2,589
    edited July 2015
    There is some useful information in the [email protected] owner's manual and they do mention mileage and duration of use as time frames for inspection and maintenance of the axle bearings and electric brakes.  The [email protected] units are obviously different than the Little Guy units but do share similarities pertaining to maintenance of the axle bearings, winterizing the units, etc.   

    And obviously systems like the Alde system and water holding tanks require winterizing, etc.  I am looking at my trailer constantly and do perform maintenance (lubrication) on the stabilizers, trailer tongue, hinges, etc.  And depending where I am staying or store my unit I'm looking for insects like ants as I've always had quite the time with this down in Florida where I store the trailer while staying in a condo, etc.  

    Another thing I do is protect my trailer against rust and inspect the under side of the trailer because this area is exposed to the road and is virtually sand blasted and pelted with rocks and any road debris you encounter during your travels.  A wire brush helps, as does a can of black spray paint to protect and preserve the metal frame.  

    Proper tire inflation is important too prior to travel and applying grease to the hitch ball and lubricating the tongue hitch's moving parts is essential whether prior to a trip or maintaining these parts when parked.  

    Inspect the caulk along the seams of the trailer along the walls and replace if necessary.  

    Another important point (as I know that others will add to this list) to keep in mind should you take your trailer in for either new tires or axle bearing maintenance is to make sure that whomever works on your trailer DOES NOT put a hydraulic jack under the trailer axle and use the axle to lift the trailer up.  I had a guy at a local tire store recently try to do just that.  I stopped the mechanic and told him that this is a no-no and the axle manufacturers do not approve of this as it could damage the axle.  I also spoke to the store manager and he said it was good to know, but no one had ever told them about this.  

    There are other things to consider or do but inspecting your trailer's safety chains and wiring harness is another thing to look at.  The metal tag on the safety chains can be removed as it is from the chain manufacturer, but isn't needed.  Look for chain wear, check the hook attachments and check the harness for any scuffs or potential damage from pinches or abrasion.  

    Hope that helps some and I'm sure others will add to the list.  


    Mike Smith 
    Linden, Mi
    2019 [email protected] 400
  • twocutestwocutes Member Posts: 172
    Great start!  Thanks, Mike and Verna.  I will take this content and whatever else people post and create a document that can be stored centrally for reference.
    Beth
    Minnesota
    Practicing to be a wanderer
    2014 [email protected] CS-S [email protected] with wet bath, 2015 Jeep Wrangler Unlimited 6 speed
  • NomadNomad Member Posts: 7,213
    When you have them grease your bearings, also have them check the seals on the back side of the hub (probably the brake seal) - I had a leaky one on the passenger side that needed replacing when I got mine packed at the 6K mark.


  • bgualtieribgualtieri Member Posts: 273
    Dumb question..... But did I miss where the odometer is on the [email protected]? Do you just write down the mileage of your trips?

    Inquiring minds are wondering!
    2015 [email protected] S Max | 2015 Jeep Wrangler Unlimited | was PHX East Valley, now Dallas!
  • VernaVerna Administrator Posts: 5,677
    Dumb question..... But did I miss where the odometer is on the [email protected]? Do you just write down the mileage of your trips?

    Inquiring minds are wondering!
    Yes, I do write down my mileage. Every single fill-up with notes as to where and any maintenance. I also have two trip tics on my truck. I reset "A" to zero as I'm getting ready to leave to driveway, and I write it down on my book when I get back. It's actually an approximation because I don't keep track of the mileage while the camper is at a campsite and When I go sightseeing. I know that on December 27th, 2014, I left home. I got back March 25th, 2015 and the trip tic said 8,198. I actually had almost 10,000 on my wheel bearing maintenance, because I had 1,500 miles in November while in Washington, D.C..  I had my wheel bearing maintenance done the next day after I got home. 
    Verna, Columbus, IN, 2019 [email protected] 400 Boondock Lite white/red, towed by a white 2019 Ford F-150 4x4 Supercab, 3.5L V6 Ecoboost; [email protected] Administrator
  • bgualtieribgualtieri Member Posts: 273
    Hmm.
    /gets out google maps and a calendar to figure out trips since purchase in May....
    2015 [email protected] S Max | 2015 Jeep Wrangler Unlimited | was PHX East Valley, now Dallas!
  • NomadNomad Member Posts: 7,213
    Like Verna, I use one of the mileage trackers on the TV to approximate it.


  • bgualtieribgualtieri Member Posts: 273
    Well, I use the iOS app "Car Care" to track all of that for the Jeep but hadn't thought to add the camper to it. Good point. 
    2015 [email protected] S Max | 2015 Jeep Wrangler Unlimited | was PHX East Valley, now Dallas!
  • NomadNomad Member Posts: 7,213
    Man, I'm overloaded with apps because there's always an app for that.


  • RadRad Member Posts: 516
    PXLated said:
    Man, I'm overloaded with apps because there's always an app for that.
    I sure you can find an app for your apps
  • NomadNomad Member Posts: 7,213
    Betting you're right :-(


  • MouseketabMouseketab Member Posts: 874
    For mine, Dutchmen 2007

    • Replace tires every 4 years
    • Grease zerk fittings on surge brake every year
    • Check battery every year (mine is under the closet inside a battery box, so not easily accessible).
    • Once a year empty it down to the bare wood and clean, but then also have someone sit inside in the dark while someone else aims a flashlight at every seam, wheel well, etc, and see if light comes in. Mark any spots where light comes in and have it recaulked.
    • Also while crawling underneath, thoroughly look at the frame and floor to see if anything looks "off"
    • Lubricate stabilizer screws
    • Go around the outside and inside with a screwdriver and tighten down various trim screws (every chance I get, usually before every trip)
    • check air pressure before each trip
    • clean the filter on the coolcat twice a year
    • check the inside wiring to make sure connections are tight
    • defrost the fridge twice a year (mine stays plugged in all the time, so the fridge stays on)
    • check the plumbing connections under the sink before each trip
    • run some pink stuff through the sink once the first frost is announced every year
    • replace carbon/smoke detector batteries twice a year
    • check brakes and sealed bearings once a year
    Carol
    [email protected]
    #2741
    2007 Dutchmen [email protected] Clamshell, 2009 Ford Explorer Sport Trac
    Harvest, AL
  • ChanWChanW Member Posts: 2,622
    Dumb question..... But did I miss where the odometer is on the [email protected]? Do you just write down the mileage of your trips?

    Inquiring minds are wondering!
    Didn't you get an odometer with yours? B-)
    Chan  -  Buffalo NY (Beau Fleuve)
    2014 S Maxx - 2011 Tacoma 4cyl
     
     [email protected]'ll_Do_Ya
  • Denny16Denny16 Member Posts: 502
    According to the TaB Pitch axle manufacture Dexter, you should inspect and repack non sealed bearings once a year at minimum, or every 12K miles.  Someone posted a maintenance schedule recommended by Dexter, which uses three type of bearings, standard lube, EZ lube and sealed.  For standard bearings (which seem to be what NuCamp is using, the annual maintenance calls for:
    Dexter: Dexter’s standard wheel bearing configuration consists of opposed tapered roller bearing cones and cups, fitted inside of a precision machined cast hub. This method of using tapered roller bearings requires that a minimal amount of axial end play be provided at assembly. This end play is essential to the longevity of the bearings service life. This design is typically lubricated with grease, packed into the bearings. Oil lubrication is another method which is available in some of the larger Dexter’s standard wheel bearing configuration consists of opposed tapered roller bearing cones and cups, fitted inside of a precision machined cast hub. This method of using tapered roller bearings requires that a minimal amount of axial end play be provided at assembly. This end play is essential to the longevity of the bearings service life. This design is typically lubricated with grease, packed into the bearings. Oil lubrication is another method which is available in some of the larger axle capacities.axle capacities.
    2018 TaB400, Jeep Gladiator truck, Northern California Coast
  • Denny16Denny16 Member Posts: 502
    edited March 30
    As Verna mentioned, when you first take your trailer out at the start of a new season, following storage or, non-use, check your axle hubs for overheating after driving the first few miles and after any down hill grade, for overheating, which may indicate a failing bearing, or overheating of the brakes.  You see big rigs doing this after long down hill grades on the highway.

     I have had boat trailer bearings fail, after the trailer has sat for the winter, during first use in the spring.  Now, I repack (or have repacked) my trailer bearings and brakes inspected the start of each season.  

    Dexter also recommends inspecting brakes every 3 months/3K miles of use.  This is not a bad idea, better to stay ahead of any potential issues, rather than have a failure on the road.
    cheers
    2018 TaB400, Jeep Gladiator truck, Northern California Coast
  • DougHDougH Member Posts: 610
    • Annual propane system leak down test
    • Annual glycol concentration test
    2014 328d diesel wagon, 2016 [email protected] S Max, D/FW Texas

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