Hooking up shore power at home... options?

Did anyone use an adaptor like this one and plug into a regular 15 or 20 amp outlet. Will it hold up (assuming I don't run the AC on it)?



I also have my dryer outlet at home that is a dedicated 30 amp circuit, so this could be another option. However, I am not sure if it puts out 240v or 120v. I think the [email protected] can only handle 120. Also, the outlet has a different connector, so I would need an adapter. Here is one. That one gives me a normal "household" type outlet. Then I would need a second adapter to go from that to the RV type plug. Lot's of adapters and I am not sure that the voltage would be correct. Does anyone know? 


Thanks,
2020 [email protected] 320 s Boondock Lite. 2015 Kia Sorrento EX V6 AWD

Comments

  • qhumberdqhumberd Member Posts: 282
    I use the dogbone you describe to hook my garage 20 amp 120V outlet to my [email protected] 400 with no problems. I have not been able to use the surge protector with it since that house circuit is GFCI protected (I think). But I don't worry about my power stability at home compared to what I read about at campgrounds. You will be limited to the draw of your home circuit be it 15 or 20 amps, NOT 30 amps so be aware of what you turn on at the same time in the trailer when hooked up this way.

    The dryer circuit for homes is 240V and should NOT be adapted to plug into the trailer. The plugs look similar but that is where it ends. Even electricians have made this mistake when wiring plugs for new owners and the results are a disaster for the trailer. Make sure any house wiring for your trailer adapted by plug or extension is 120V service.

    2019  [email protected] Boondock Lite "Todd"

    2016 Toyota Tundra 5.7 Crew Cab
  • monamona Member Posts: 226
    Get a 30 to 15 adapter. DO NOT use the dryer plug. You will fry your electrical system. 
    2015 [email protected] S Max  white with silver trim. 2018 GC Trailhawk. 
  • newcampnewcamp Member Posts: 25
    Thanks!

    That will also be the easiest option and allow me to connect to my driveway 120v plug. I might have been overthinking this  :D 
    2020 [email protected] 320 s Boondock Lite. 2015 Kia Sorrento EX V6 AWD
  • berggerbergger Member Posts: 518
    I also use that one and it has worked well.  I use that adapter when my trailer is parked near my full hookups on the side of my house.  At times I have it parked next to the barn, too far for my 30 amp cord, so at that time I just use a 12 ga extension cord and use this adapter. 



     It too works well but does not allow me to use my EMS.  However I am generally not too concerned about electrical issues at my house as compared to campgrounds.  But my preference is to use the 30 amp cord and dogbone you describe.  
    2021 [email protected] 400 BD  "Vixen Gail" 
    2018 Nissan Titan Pro 4X "Big Bird"
    Leadville Colorado
  • ScottGScottG Administrator Posts: 5,073
    You can also get a simple 15A-->30A RV adapter without the "dogbone" if you prefer. That's what I use since one came with the trailer.

    However, the slimmer dogbone type probably fits a typical campground pedestal a little better.

    I second the warning about using a typical household dryer (or any other large dedicated receptacle other than one specifically wired for 120V 30A RV use) to plug in your [email protected] There are other adapters out there that might make such an arrangement work, but unless you know exactly what you are doing you run a significant risk of serious damage. Even if you hire a licensed electrician to install an RV outlet for you, be wary as even they have made mistakes wiring this particular application!  
    1530A RV Elec Adapter  Allendale True Value

  • FergieFergie Member Posts: 142
    There is a whole thread on this subject with warnings! See my post with the attachment. Many licensed electricians are not familiar with RV/Marine electrical hardware and standards that are unique compared to household ad commercial world. Using the wrong hardware and their connections can "fry" you wiring and electronics!

    https://tab-rv.vanillacommunity.com/discussion/comment/119623#Comment_119623

    Fergie
     
  • pthomas745pthomas745 Moderator Posts: 2,573
    I have the "dogbone".  I also purchased that "adapter" ScottG shows.  I have a friend with an outside plug that is recessed into the side of the house too far for the dogbone to fit.
    Keep in mind the Amp Rating of the circuit you are plugging into.  A 15 amp circuit will run the Alde on the 1KW setting.  It will not run the Alde on the 2KW setting, since the two electrical components together need just over 16 amps. 
    2017 Outback
    Towed by 2014 Touareg TDi
  • newcampnewcamp Member Posts: 25
    edited May 9
    Interesting read. Thanks!

    I bought the 15 to 30 dog bone thingy and I guess this will be good for at least running the fridge and keeping the battery fresh. I will probably not turn on the AC or Alde with that configuration. 

    It seemed from reading the other thread that there are converters bringing the voltage down from 240 to 120. My Dryer outlet is a NEMA 10-30R. Is there a good adapter/converter that would bring down the voltage while keeping the amps at 30? Does any of them have the typical RV outlet at the other end so I can plug in my 30 amp shore power cable? Does anyone have a link to a good one? Is this a safe route to go?

    Thanks,
    2020 [email protected] 320 s Boondock Lite. 2015 Kia Sorrento EX V6 AWD
  • Deb55Deb55 Member Posts: 244
    We plug into a normal household plug that we had installed on the outside of the garage just for the camper. We use the adapter and a surge protector, and we've been able to run the fridge, some lights, and the AC without an issue. 
  • marleecampsmarleecamps Member Posts: 18
    I always use my EMS at home while preparing for a trip (cooling frig, etc.).  I use a short electrical cord to plug the EMS into my exterior outlet.  Better safe than sorry with thunderstorm season in full play here in Minnesota.
    --Marlee
    2021 Tab400 Boondock; TV 2015 Jeep Grand Cherokee; Minnesota
  • ScottGScottG Administrator Posts: 5,073
    @newcamp, as far as amperage goes, "keeping the amps at 30" is not a concern. Amperage is determined by how much power (i.e., current) the thing you have plugged in draws from the circuit. The amperage rating of a circuit is simply the maximum current that the circuit can handle--if you try to draw too much, the breaker or fuse protecting the circuit will trip.

    The bigger problem is the 240V vs 120V issue. In a nutshell, 240V circuits have two "hot" legs, 120V circuits have a hot leg and a neutral, and 240V/120V circuits (typical for an electric dryer or range) have two hot legs and a neutral. An adapter--if you could find one--might be able to "ignore" one hot leg in a 240V/120V receptacle, thus making it strictly 120V.

    If all this sounds like gibberish, then you are best advised to abandon any plans to power your [email protected] with a dryer receptacle. A standard 15A or 20A household circuit is generally sufficient for what most of us do at home. If it doesn't meet your needs, I would look into installing a new, dedicated 120V 30A RV receptacle.
  • Grumpy_GGrumpy_G Member Posts: 135
    Dryer to 30A RV adapters are readily available but do not plug in the camper until you have verified the adapter is wired correctly (120V between the blade pins). A bit overkill, and I just use a 15A adapter to pre-cool the fridge and possibly pre-heat the Alde. 
  • ScottGScottG Administrator Posts: 5,073
    edited May 9
    And if you insist on hooking up to a dryer receptacle, here's a typical adapter like what @Grumpy_G mentioned. Following up on my previous comment, note that only one of the hot legs from the dryer side is passed to the RV side. Regardless, I think double-checking everything with a voltmeter between the hot and neutral slots is good advice.

    Note that some older 120/240V 30A dryer receptacles may have only three blades. In those cases, there are still two hot legs, but the neutral and safety grounds are combined. These are no longer code compliant in new installations, but are still in use in many older houses. Here is an adapter for a three prong dryer receptacle--don't be fooled by the fact that both ends look very similar!

    10-30P Male 3-Pin Dryer Plug to TT-30R 3-Prong Female RV Travel Trailer  Camper Receptacle Outlet Box NEMA Electric Power Cord AdapterConverter  220250V Input 110125V Output  Tools  Home Improvement




  • Denny16Denny16 Member Posts: 4,276
    edited May 10
    Scott, technically, there isn’t a neutral connection to the older three-pin 220VAC dryer hookups, just two hots (120VAC each) and the ground.  The neutral was  added to the newer 4-pin setups.  It is true that the neutral is combined with the ground, but this is at the main electrical panel.  

    In 120VAC circuits, the neutral needs to run as a separate wire/connection, in addition to a ground (added for safety to trip circuit breakers more efficiently in case of a short, and to prevent the person using an appliance from becoming the ground.  I would not recommend (per our certified electrician) using the three-pin 120VAC splitter/adapter on these older setups, as you do not have a dedicated neutral connection.   Without the proper neutral connection, GFIs are not going to work correctly either.
     Cheers 
    2018 TaB400 Custom Boondock,  Jeep Gladiator truck, Northern California Coast.
  • Da_BirdsDa_Birds Member Posts: 113
    edited May 10
    I use the camco dogbone at home and never had issues. If I use the Alde I use the lower power setting (1KW). Without looking, I believe this is recommended whenever you're not plugged into 30amp service. If I need to use the Alde and the AC I switch the Adle to use propane only. No issues either way with the fridge on. I never plugged anything into the 110V outlets that would draw a lot of amps but have used them to power/charge my laptop. I don't typically use any any protection since I know my home is wired properly and I plug into a GFI outlet.
    Just be conscious of how much power your using (in particular anything that draws a lot of amps) and the dogbone will be just fine.


    2021 [email protected] 320CSS Boondock - "Chirping Bird"
    2018 Chevy Colorado - "Dad's Truck"
  • ScottGScottG Administrator Posts: 5,073
    edited May 11
    Denny16 said:
    Scott, technically, there isn’t a neutral connection to the older three-pin 220VAC dryer hookups, just two hots (120VAC each) and the ground.  The neutral was  added to the newer 4-pin setups.  It is true that the neutral is combined with the ground, but this is at the main electrical panel.  

    In 120VAC circuits, the neutral needs to run as a separate wire/connection, in addition to a ground (added for safety to trip circuit breakers more efficiently in case of a short, and to prevent the person using an appliance from becoming the ground.  I would not recommend (per our certified electrician) using the three-pin 120VAC splitter/adapter on these older setups, as you do not have a dedicated neutral connection.   Without the proper neutral connection, GFIs are not going to work correctly either.
     Cheers 
    Semantics, I suppose. The 3-prong plugs still delivered 120/240V (as opposed to just 240V). In order to deliver 120V, a path back to ground is required to complete the circuit from one of the hot legs. In a 3-prong arrangement that path is provided by the single ground wire.
    Now for one of my favorite soapbox topics...  In a 120V circuit there is nothing "neutral" about the neutral wire--it carries current back to ground from a single hot leg and can still shock you if you interrupt that path to ground. For this reason, I prefer the more accurate term operating ground to distinguish this current-carrying wire from the normally non current-carrying safety ground whose job is to prevent a dangerous "hot skin" condition in the event of a short in the appliance chassis.
    So in an older 3-prong arrangement the operating ground (commonly but incorrectly called the "neutral") and safety grounds are served by a single wire.
    Regardless, I do agree using a three-prong adapter like the one I showed in my previous post is not best practice for hooking up your [email protected]
    More info here.
  • Denny16Denny16 Member Posts: 4,276
    edited May 11
    True, the neutral connection on household wiring was the power circuit return leg, and you can get shocked from both the hot and neutral if you are grounded. Because of this shock hazard, household wiring codes added a separate ground leg to the outlets.  Previously, they only had two connections, no third ground pins, that are common today.  That said, the ground and neutral busses are tied together at the main panel only.  

    The power coming into a house, or anywhere else on single phase, is two 120 VAC hot wires, which when metered across both legs gives you 220VAC, you do not need a neutral or ground to get 220VAC.  The ground added to 220VAC circuits is a safety issue to prevent shocks, and allow circuit breakers to rip quicker.  However, to get 120 VAC, you need the ground to complete the circuit, as Scott pointed out.  The neutral leg/buss provides an isolated ground (all neutral wires are connected at the main power panel to ground) to get 120VAC.  

    Many modern 120VAC electrical appliances and electronic devices need both a neutral and ground to work correctly.
     Cheers 
    2018 TaB400 Custom Boondock,  Jeep Gladiator truck, Northern California Coast.
  • linolino Member Posts: 205
    edited May 12
    I have been using the first one for years and seems to be no problem
  • AnOldURAnOldUR Member Posts: 613
    edited May 12
    My understanding is that a 50 amp 240V double pole breaker is actually two opposite phased single pole 50amp breakers tied together so that if one leg trips, they both do. Wouldn’t this mean that if you use a 50 amp to 30 amp adapter you’re using wire rated for 30 amp to supply power to your trailer but it’s improperly protected by a 50 amp breaker?
    2020 nuCamp [email protected] 320S * 2D Jeep Wrangler * Stockton, New Jersey
    [email protected] since Feb 2021
    9 outings * 34 nights in 2021
    2022 tour in progress * 1 outing * camped in 27 States so far

  • ScottGScottG Administrator Posts: 5,073
    AnOldUR said:
    My understanding is that a 50 amp 240V double pole breaker is actually two opposite phased single pole 50amp breakers tied together so that if one leg trips, they both do. Wouldn’t this mean that if you use a 50 amp to 30 amp adapter you’re using wire rated for 30 amp to supply power to your trailer but it’s improperly protected by a 50 amp breaker?
    Technically yes, but the trailer won't draw more than 30A. If you try, the 30A main breaker in the power center will trip.

  • subkronsubkron Member Posts: 44
    One option to consider, at a cost, is to install  or have installed a 30A weatherproof RV receptacle. No worries at that point about safety.
    2022 [email protected] 400 Boondock
    2015 RAM 1500 Outdoorsman Quad Cab
    South Jersey
  • Denny16Denny16 Member Posts: 4,276
    edited May 12
    On the ganged 50-amp dual breaker, one leg can trip without tripping the other side.  A tripped breaker only goes half way to center when it is tripped.  The connecting link is loose enough (by UL specifications) to allow one side to trip, which would shut down a 220 VAC circuit.  An adapter using only one side could also only trip the one side.  

    The TaB 30 amp AC connection will only draw a max of 30-amps, any greater of a load will trip the trailer’s 30-mp breaker.  So both sides of the power cable are protected, as is the TaB.
     Cheers 
    2018 TaB400 Custom Boondock,  Jeep Gladiator truck, Northern California Coast.
  • AnOldURAnOldUR Member Posts: 613
    @ScottG & @Denny16. My concern was not for the trailer, but for the power cord. As you both say, the trailer itself can never draw more than 30 amps and a short in the cord that would make a 30 amp breaker trip, but not a 50 amp would probably be impossible. Just me overthinking again.  ;)
    2020 nuCamp [email protected] 320S * 2D Jeep Wrangler * Stockton, New Jersey
    [email protected] since Feb 2021
    9 outings * 34 nights in 2021
    2022 tour in progress * 1 outing * camped in 27 States so far

  • Denny16Denny16 Member Posts: 4,276
    No @AnOldUR a 30 amp load is generated by the TaB, and it’s cable is rated 30-amps, so OK there.  Only higher load on the 30-amp cable, would be a dead short, which would trip the 50-amp breaker in any case. You can attach a smaller load to a higher rated power source safely, bit not the other way round (a 50-amp load on a 30-amp circuit (cable and breaker, which could cause a fire).
     Cheers 
    2018 TaB400 Custom Boondock,  Jeep Gladiator truck, Northern California Coast.
  • AnOldURAnOldUR Member Posts: 613
    I apologize for taking this off topic, but it finally sunk in. Thinking of the breaker at the post as being a main and the trailer as a sub-panel off of it, the wire connecting the two would only have to be rated for the highest breaker in the sub-panel. Thanks for setting me straight.
    2020 nuCamp [email protected] 320S * 2D Jeep Wrangler * Stockton, New Jersey
    [email protected] since Feb 2021
    9 outings * 34 nights in 2021
    2022 tour in progress * 1 outing * camped in 27 States so far

  • Denny16Denny16 Member Posts: 4,276
    No worries mate, stay safe and happy travels…
    cheers 
    2018 TaB400 Custom Boondock,  Jeep Gladiator truck, Northern California Coast.
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