surge protector?

I've seen surge protector recommended. Where would a surge protector go? not outside in the rain. I don't understand where to use one.
2017 Tab 320 S
2014 Mazda CX 5
Traveling very light to be kind to my transmission.

Comments

  • atlasbatlasb Posts: 390Member
    I hardwired ours in the alde compartment in or 400.  The display is mounted by the light switch near the closet.  This allows me to check what is going on.  Hardwired means to me it is protected inside and not outside.  I have the delay set to give extra time checking the Alde is off before the power comes on.
    2018 [email protected] 400, 2016 Nissan Frontier Crew cab
  • dragonsdoflydragonsdofly Posts: 991Member
    @melpeter, the surge protector is usually plugged into the pedestal/power source. Many of the more complex ones detect bad connections, reversed polarity, etc so you plug into the pedestal and check to make sure everything is wired correctly. After that check, you plug the [email protected]'s power cord into the surge protector. These are exterior units, not the kind inside your house, and specifically made for the rigors of the environment. Some people will pull a large heavy-duty garbage bag over the pedestal and connection and bungie or tape it in place, but is not actually required. Just like the power cord of the [email protected] can take the cold, heat, rain and sun, this type of surge protector is made to do just that. Btw, we just experienced plugging into a pedestal this fall and found it to have reversed polarity. When we notified the office of the rv park, they insisted it was not possible to have reversed polarity. My husband drew an electrical diagram of how it was improperly wired and what would have to be done to correct the problem. We plugged into another properly wired pedestal eventually. That unit was worth all that we had paid for it and 10 times more because it saved us from possibly damaging all the electronics in the [email protected], and anything ese we may have plugged in. I highly recommend you purchase one, learn how to use it, faithfully connect through it. -Denise
    2017 [email protected] sofitel([email protected])TV 2005 gmc envoy xl. Wyandotte, Michigan.
    Draco dormiens numquam titilandus.
  • falcon1970falcon1970 Posts: 194Member
    @melpeter
    The term "surge protector" is rather misleading although these devices are usually referred to as such.  They are really much more than just protection from electrical surges.  They are properly called "electrical management systems (EMS)" and protect you from surges, reversed polarity, over/under voltage, brownouts, hot grounds, other mis-wired pedestal effects, and even more.
    Look up an outfit called Progressive Industries for a good explanation of what they can do.  Progressive Industries is not the only game in town, others offer similar systems, but Progressive Industries is one of the major names.
  • melpetermelpeter Posts: 43Member
    edited February 9
    thanks! ok, next...so now I see all these different models at Progressive Industries. I'm clueless. I don't need 50 amps, right? So EMS-HW30C would be the one I need? oops. that one is hard wired. EMS-PT30X would be the one to buy?
    2017 Tab 320 S
    2014 Mazda CX 5
    Traveling very light to be kind to my transmission.
  • rfuss928rfuss928 Posts: 453Member
    Those are the correct models. 
    Although the hard wired unit requires (relatively simple) installation, it solves all the weather and theft concerns and is always in place, ready to protect.
    Ours has been protecting [email protected] for ~7 years.
    Have fun!!
    Bob


    Bob & Rosalie Fuss - Spencerport NY
    [email protected] travels  ---
    -- 2009 Dutchman CS ---366 nights out --- 67633 miles traveled--
    States Visited Mapstatemap
    DREAM - WANDER - EXPLORE
  • Sharon_is_SAMSharon_is_SAM Posts: 3,720Moderator
    @melpeter, yes the EMS PT30X is a portable system appropriate for your TaB.  It has all the advanced warnings to keep your electricals safe.  You will need to get a cable lock and chain it to the electrical pedestal.  They are fine to be left out in the rain, but we cover ours lightly.  While it is true that the interior installed units have a convenience and anti-theft advantage, the portables work just fine, too.  
    Sharon / 2017 [email protected] CSS / 2015 Toyota Sienna Minivan / Cleveland Heights, Ohio
       
                                           
  • HomebodyatheartHomebodyatheart Posts: 1,886Member
    @melpeter this is my setup. I also have a 30 to 110 dog bone for plugging in at home, and carry a 30 to 50 end if I ever needed it. So far it’s never been used, but I’ve got it. This setup has worked great for me as I just wind the bike cable around the pole and lock it up. Never had problems in two years. 
    2017 [email protected] 320 Max S silver and cherry red, [email protected] ("Bug" aka my [email protected] pod), TV 2015 Toyota Highlander aka Big Red
  • melpetermelpeter Posts: 43Member
    Thanks - these devices are much cheaper than the Progressive Industries ones, which cost $250. 
    2017 Tab 320 S
    2014 Mazda CX 5
    Traveling very light to be kind to my transmission.
  • dsfdogsdsfdogs Posts: 295Member
    There are different versions...the $250 model offers greater protection.

    Debbie in Oregon
    2018 [email protected] 320 S/2019 Toyota 4Runner SR5
  • N7SHG_HamN7SHG_Ham Posts: 324Member
    I have the Progressive Industries one, but I now wished I had of bought the Surge Guard brand, even more features including now a remote wireless display showing the data the unit sees. In addition it is only brand I believe that has load side protection too, important if something were to vibrate loose in the trailer. https://rvpower.southwire.com/products/surge-protection/
  • BaylissBayliss Posts: 111Member
    edited February 23
    @N7SHG_Ham , I recently ordered the Progressive Industries (PI) EMS-HW30C (hardwired Electric Management System) surge protector and it is on its way to my house now.

    https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B002UC6RSA/ref=ppx_yo_dt_b_asin_title_o01_s00?ie=UTF8&psc=1

    Although not "wireless," it is "remote" in the sense that it uses a data cable that looks like a standard phone line cable and can be located in a convenient location for monitoring the surge protector status.  I do not know if the PI device has a load side protection, but I didn't say anything about that feature being on the Surge Guard.  However, the PI EMS includes a bypass switch.  This is a very nice feature, because in the event the EMS is "fried" by an electrical power event, you can bypass the EMS until you are able to obtain and replace the destroyed circuit board (i.e., the EMS has a modular design for easy repair without having to purchase an entirely new unit.)  The bypass switch also avoids the need to manually re-connect the [email protected] power wires (i.e., you don't have to remove the wiring from the EMS to manually bypass it, which is apparently what you had to do before PI added a bypass switch.)  [A side benefit of the bypass switch is that if you are powering your [email protected] with a portable inverter type generator, such as a Honda 2000i, this switch will allow you to bypass the EMS system when you get an "open ground" error, but you will still have the benefit of the surge protector.]

    Out of curiosity, which Surge Guard model are you specifically referring to?  If it is Model #35530  https://rvpower.southwire.com/products/hardwired-surge-protection/30a-hardwire-model-35530/  the remote monitor is sold separately and also uses a datacom connection.

    The PI remote display automatically rotates through a limited amount of information, whereas you must manually scroll through 16 data items with the Surge Guard remote, using a small joystick, which is part of the monitor.  I do not know enough about the Surge Guard to assess how helpful or necessary the additional available data may be.

    I am familiar with Surge Guard, but I did not realize that they have a hardwired unit until I read your post.  Although I am going to stick with the PI system, you have piqued my curiosity about the Surge Guard, so I plan to take a closer look at it.  Thank you for making me aware of it.  (Greg)
    Bayliss - 2019 [email protected] 320 S Boondock Lite; TV = 2007 Toyota Tundra
                  Greg & Marlene (Tucson, AZ)


  • N7SHG_HamN7SHG_Ham Posts: 324Member
    @Bayliss, I have the exact one you do, but if I had of known... NuCamp added mine (after I purchased it) at the factory, I think I should of got one of these other ones and hard wired it myself. Cam always be done later I suppose.
  • ObiruObiru Posts: 12Member
    I’ve been using this one and it works just fine. Reasonable price.
    PROGRESSIVE INDUSTRIES SSP-30XL Surge Protector with Cover (30 Amp) https://www.amazon.com/dp/B015Y9MX38/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_tai_mPnCCbJVBDDH3
  • Sharon_is_SAMSharon_is_SAM Posts: 3,720Moderator
    @Obiru, the regular surge protectors do not protect against low voltage (bad for the TaB electronics), etc.  Compare it to the EMS version.


    Sharon / 2017 [email protected] CSS / 2015 Toyota Sienna Minivan / Cleveland Heights, Ohio
       
                                           
  • melpetermelpeter Posts: 43Member
    Thanks! This is great reference. 
    2017 Tab 320 S
    2014 Mazda CX 5
    Traveling very light to be kind to my transmission.
  • ObiruObiru Posts: 12Member
    @Obiru, the regular surge protectors do not protect against low voltage (bad for the TaB electronics), etc.  Compare it to the EMS version.


    Thanks. I guess I didn’t do my research well enough :(
  • Sharon_is_SAMSharon_is_SAM Posts: 3,720Moderator
    Some members get away with using a surge protector for years.  But, I have read so much about campgrounds, both public and private that do not keep up their electric pedestals, grounding, etc.  Better safe than sorry.
    Sharon / 2017 [email protected] CSS / 2015 Toyota Sienna Minivan / Cleveland Heights, Ohio
       
                                           
  • ObiruObiru Posts: 12Member
    Some members get away with using a surge protector for years.  But, I have read so much about campgrounds, both public and private that do not keep up their electric pedestals, grounding, etc.  Better safe than sorry.
    Totally agree. I'm new to the RV world and never knew there were issues with low voltage. I plan on taking 6 months to travel up to Newfoundland and back across Canada to the West coast and will be at many different sites. Don't want to worry about low/high voltage situations.

  • ScottGScottG Posts: 2,744Moderator
    Some members get away with using nothing for years. Plug up and live dangerously!  ;-)
  • jkjennjkjenn Posts: 5,136Member
    I had mine Installed when I picked it up. It has saved my bacon 2x. Once during g a lightning storm in Moab and the other with poor campground wiring.

    Some people test when they set up at the pedestal but that gives you one time monitoring and not ongoing.

    Jenn Grover | 2015  [email protected] S Max Silver/Turquoise Trim | 2018 Jeep Grand Cherokee Trailhawk v6 | Nights spent in [email protected]: 180 | Pittsburgh PA

  • ScottGScottG Posts: 2,744Moderator
    Kidding aside, I don't usually camp with hook-ups, but have considered the wisdom of adding a protective device to the arsenal for those occasions when I do.
    Not being very familiar with these, I'm curious as to how one knows when one's bacon has been saved by such a unit. Do they retain records of catastrophic voltage events for later review? 
  • jkjennjkjenn Posts: 5,136Member
    ScottG said:
    Kidding aside, I don't usually camp with hook-ups, but have considered the wisdom of adding a protective device to the arsenal for those occasions when I do.
    Not being very familiar with these, I'm curious as to how one knows when one's bacon has been saved by such a unit. Do they retain records of catastrophic voltage events for later review? 
    The Progressive EMS prevents the power from hitting the converter and gives you an error message. When you decide the error, you have a pretty good idea what was intercepted.

    Jenn Grover | 2015  [email protected] S Max Silver/Turquoise Trim | 2018 Jeep Grand Cherokee Trailhawk v6 | Nights spent in [email protected]: 180 | Pittsburgh PA

  • BaylissBayliss Posts: 111Member
    edited February 24
    Here's an expanded version of what @Sharon_is_SAM posted earlier, plus a quick guide to choosing the right product if you are considering a Progressive Industries device.  I only include it in the event someone is considering a hardwired EMS, which I decided to go with (i.e., the EMS-HW30C).  (Greg)

    comparison-chartpng

    PI_SurgeProtection_ProductSelectionChart
    Bayliss - 2019 [email protected] 320 S Boondock Lite; TV = 2007 Toyota Tundra
                  Greg & Marlene (Tucson, AZ)


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